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natural-ways-to-support-your-childs-immunity

Presented by Culturelle.

With the winter season in full swing, it’s important to keep your family healthy. Constant hand washing, a warm coat, and an endless supply of tissues can only go so far. Luckily, there are plenty of natural ways to help boost your child’s immune system.

Here are four supplements that will keep your children healthy and happy throughout the colder season.

1. Echinacea

Echinacea is a natural herb that comes from Asteraceae, a daisy-like flower. This herb is commonly used to try and cure or prevent the cold and the flu. Echinacea is available in liquids, tablets, and even chewable versions or drops for children.

2. Vitamin C

Vitamin C is an age-old remedy for cold and flu symptoms. It’s been known to fight off germs and shorten the length of an existing illness. Vitamin C is found in tons of kid-friendly snacks, including oranges, strawberries, pineapples, kiwis, and mangoes. It can also be found as a powder, a chewable, or a capsule.

3. Zinc

Zinc is a mineral found in our cells that helps boost our immunity, heal wounds, and break down carbohydrates. Foods high in protein such as beef, pork, lamb, and nuts contain plenty of zinc. If you have a picky eater that won’t go near any of those foods, you can try giving them a capsule supplement.

4. Probiotics

Probiotics are organisms such as bacteria that are normally found in the gut. Taking a probiotic can help to improve and strengthen digestive health. Studies have shown that probiotics have even helped soothe children’s stomach problems. Many moms can trust Culturelle© Kids Probiotic because it is the #1 Pediatrician recommended probiotic brand. † Containing 100% naturally sourced Lactobacillus GG - the #1 clinically studied probiotic strain in children – it comes in useful packets that can be dissolved into your smaller child’s favorite food or drink, or chewables for big kids. ††

† Based on a 2014 survey among pediatricians recommending a probiotic brand.
†† Based on the number of Lactobacillus GG clinical studies, as of August 2014. 

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